A Virginia-Specific Summary Guide: The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine

A Virginia-Specific Summary Guide: The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine
Publication Date: 2017
Available Formats: Print (385 pages, softcover, 1 volume)
  Electronic (searchable PDF via flash drive, CD, or immediate download)
  Both Print and Electronic formats
Product #: 966

Information

Virginia Perspectives on:
  • Participants: Clients
  • Participants: Lawyers
  • Content: Legal Advice
  • Crime-Fraud Exception
  • Expectation of Confidentiality
  • Waiver
  • Work Product Doctrine
  • Asserting the Protections
  • Litigating the Protections

"A Virginia-Specific Summary Guide: The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine provides Virginia practitioners a quick and easy-to-use guide to unique and important Virginia-specific attorney-client privilege and work product principles. The book generally summarizes the consensus approach to most privilege and work product topics, but it also contains specific Virginia citations for those issues where Virginia deviates from the majority rule, or has selected from a number of positions that states recognize, such as the degree of "anticipation" required to support a work product claim." —Thomas E. Spahn, author

This Virginia-specific book is a condensed version of the 1,500+ pages book also published by Virginia CLE®, entitled The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner's Guide (3d Edition 2013). The Summary Guide is designed to help Virginia practitioners understand general attorney-client and work product concepts, with a specific focus on Virginia law addressing those evidentiary protections. While the larger Practitioner's Guide covers privilege and work product law at length and on a national scale, the Summary Guide cites cases from outside Virginia only if they are especially noteworthy.

Tom Spahn continues to monitor attorney-client and work product cases throughout the country, and has made summaries of those cases available at an online database at http://attorneyclientprivilege.mcguirewoods.com. Though available to everyone, the database will be most beneficial to those owning either the Summary Guide or Practitioner's Guide, as the database is keyed to the chapter and section headings common to both books. By using the database in concert with the book, you’ll have the most up-to-date information on these very important, and often misunderstood and misapplied, legal doctrines.


You may also be interested in:


The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner's Guide

Virginia Civil Practice Forms

A Guide to the Rules of Evidence in Virginia

Objections: Interrogatories, Depositions, and Trial

Civil Discovery in Virginia

Appellate Practice - Virginia and Federal Courts

Attorney Fees and Sanctions - Virginia and Federal Courts

The Law of Defamation in Virginia

Insurance Law in Virginia

The Virginia Arbitration Roadmap
     

 

Table of Contents


CHAPTER LIST

1. ORGANIZATION OF THE OUTLINE

2. ATTORNEY-CLIENT PRIVILEGE: INTRODUCTION AND BASIC PRINCIPLES

3. CLIENTS: INTRODUCTION AND BASIC PRINCIPLES

4. CLIENT RELATIONSHIPS

5. JOINT CLIENTS

6. CORPORATE CLIENTS

7. THE “FIDUCIARY EXCEPTION”

8. CLIENT AGENTS/CONSULTANTS

9. LAWYERS

10. LAWYER AGENTS/CONSULTANTS

11. UNPROTECTED BACKGROUND INFORMATION

12. CONTENT AND “COMMUNICATION” ELEMENT

13. CONTENT: LEGAL ADVICE REQUIREMENT

14. ANALYZING THE LAWYER’S ROLE

15. BUSINESS AND OTHER NONLEGAL ADVICE

16. CLIENT-TO-LAWYER COMMUNICATIONS

17. LAWYER-TO-CLIENT COMMUNICATIONS

18. THE CRIME-FRAUD EXCEPTION

19. PRESENCE OF THIRD PARTIES

20. THE JOINT DEFENSE/COMMON INTEREST DOCTRINE

21. INTENT TO DISCLOSE CONTENT

22. INTERNAL CORPORATE INVESTIGATIONS AND INSURANCE

23. WAIVER OF THE PRIVILEGE

24. POWER TO WAIVE THE PRIVILEGE

25. EXPRESS WAIVER

26. INTENTIONAL EXPRESS WAIVER

27. INADVERTENT EXPRESS WAIVER

28. IMPLIED WAIVER

29. THE “AT ISSUE” DOCTRINE

30. SUBJECT MATTER WAIVER

31. SCOPE OF A SUBJECT MATTER WAIVER

32. WAIVER: NEW RULES AND PUBLIC POLICY DEBATES

33. WORK PRODUCT DOCTRINE: HISTORIC PERSPECTIVE

34. CREATING AND ASSERTING WORK PRODUCT PROTECTION

35. CONTEXT AND TIMING OF WORK PRODUCT

36. “LITIGATION” ELEMENT

37. “ANTICIPATION OF LITIGATION” ELEMENT

38. “MOTIVATION” ELEMENT

39. WORK PRODUCT CONTENT

40. FACT WORK PRODUCT

41. OPINION WORK PRODUCT

42. FACTS REFLECTING THE LAWYER’S OPINION

43. PROTECTION FOR INTERNAL CORPORATE INVESTIGATIONS

44. OVERCOMING WORK PRODUCT PROTECTION

45. OVERCOMING FACT WORK PRODUCT PROTECTION

46. OVERCOMING OPINION WORK PRODUCT PROTECTION

47. POWER TO WAIVE WORK PRODUCT PROTECTION

48. INTENTIONAL, INADVERTENT, OR IMPLIED WAIVER

49. DISCLOSURE OF WORK PRODUCT TO AND BY EXPERTS

50. SUBJECT MATTER WAIVER: APPLICABILITY AND SCOPE

51. ASSERTING AND LITIGATING THE PROTECTIONS

52. SOURCE AND CHOICE OF ATTORNEY-CLIENT PRIVILEGE LAW

53. SOURCE AND CHOICE OF WORK PRODUCT LAW

54. ASSERTING THE PROTECTIONS

55. PRIVILEGE LOGS

56. EVIDENTIARY SUPPORT

57. LITIGATING THE PROTECTIONS

58. OTHER DISCOVERY ISSUES

59. COURTS’ ROLE

60. APPELLATE REVIEW


CHAPTER 1:    ORGANIZATION OF THE OUTLINE

1.1    INTRODUCTION

1.2    ATTORNEY-CLIENT PRIVILEGE

1.3    CLIENTS

1.4    LAWYERS

1.5    CONTENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

1.6    CONTEXT OF COMMUNICATION

1.7    PRIVILEGE PROTECTION FOR INTERNAL CORPORATE INVESTIGATION

1.8    WAIVER OF THE PRIVILEGE

1.9    WORK PRODUCT PROTECTION

1.10    PROTECTED CONTENT

1.11    PROTECTION FOR INTERNAL CORPORATE INVESTIGATIONS

1.12    OVERCOMING WORK PRODUCT PROTECTION

1.13    WAIVER OF THE WORK PRODUCT PROTECTION

1.14    LITIGATION OVERVIEW

1.15    SOURCE AND CHOICE OF LAW

1.16    ASSERTING THE PROTECTIONS

1.17    LITIGATING THE PROTECTIONS

CHAPTER 2:    ATTORNEY-CLIENT PRIVILEGE: INTRODUCTION AND BASIC PRINCIPLES

2.1    INTRODUCTION

2.2    ETHICS DUTY OF CONFIDENTIALITY CONTRASTED

2.3    SOCIETAL BENEFITS AND COSTS OF THE PRIVILEGE

2.4    THE PRIVILEGE’S ABSOLUTE PROTECTION

2.5    CLIENTS’ AND LAWYERS’ INABILITY TO CREATE OR DISCLAIM PRIVILEGE PROTECTION

2.6    CONSENSUS FORMULATION

2.7    KEY ELEMENTS OF THE PRIVILEGE

2.8    TYPES OF PRIVILEGED COMMUNICATIONS

2.9    CURRENT TRENDS AND THE FUTURE

CHAPTER 3:    CLIENTS: INTRODUCTION AND BASIC PRINCIPLES

3.1    INTRODUCTION

3.2    EXISTENCE OF AN ATTORNEY-CLIENT RELATIONSHIP

3.3    CLIENT’S ACTIONS AND UNCOMMUNICATED STATEMENTS

3.4    CLIENT’S OWNERSHIP OF THE PRIVILEGE

CHAPTER 4:    CLIENT RELATIONSHIPS

4.1    INTRODUCTION

4.2    PROSPECTIVE CLIENTS

4.3    INDIVIDUAL CLIENTS

4.4    GOVERNMENT ENTITIES AS CLIENTS

4.5    NON-CORPORATE INSTITUTIONAL CLIENTS

CHAPTER 5:    JOINT CLIENTS

5.1    INTRODUCTION

5.2    NUMBER OF JOINTLY REPRESENTED CLIENTS

5.3    EXISTENCE OF A JOINT REPRESENTATION

5.4    EFFECT OF A JOINT REPRESENTATION: ETHICS RULES

5.5    EFFECT OF A JOINT REPRESENTATION: PRIVILEGE PRINCIPLES

5.6    WAIVER IN JOINT REPRESENTATIONS

5.7    ADVERSITY AMONG JOINTLY REPRESENTED CLIENTS

5.8    COMPARISON TO COMMON INTEREST AGREEMENTS

CHAPTER 6:    CORPORATE CLIENTS

6.1    INTRODUCTION

6.2    DEFINING THE “CLIENT” WITHIN A CORPORATE ENTITY

6.3    COMMUNICATIONS WITHIN A CORPORATE FAMILY

6.4    EFFECT OF CORPORATE STOCK TRANSACTIONS

6.5    EFFECT OF CORPORATE ASSET TRANSACTIONS

6.6    REPRESENTATION OF CORPORATE AFFILIATES IN THE TRANSACTION

6.7    AGREEMENTS ALTERING THE PRIVILEGE’S OWNERSHIP

6.8    BANKRUPT AND DEFUNCT CORPORATIONS

6.9    SEPARATE AND JOINT REPRESENTATIONS OF EMPLOYEES

6.10    UPJOHN STANDARD FOR COMMUNICATIONS

6.11    “NEED TO KNOW” STANDARD FOR COMMUNICATIONS

6.12    COMMUNICATIONS WITH FORMER EMPLOYEES

6.13    COMMUNICATIONS WITH INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS

6.14    COMMUNICATIONS WITH AGENTS/CONSULTANTS

6.15    RIGHT TO PRIVILEGED COMMUNICATIONS

CHAPTER 7:    THE “FIDUCIARY EXCEPTION”

7.1    INTRODUCTION

7.2    HISTORIC TRUST PRINCIPLE

7.3    SHAREHOLDERS’ RIGHT TO PRIVILEGED COMMUNICATIONS

7.4    NAMING THE EXPANDED DOCTRINE

7.5    COURTS’ CONTINUING DEBATE ABOUT APPLICABILITY

7.6    ABSENCE OF “GOOD CAUSE” REQUIREMENT

7.7    EXAMPLES TO WHICH EXCEPTION APPLIES

7.8    EXAMPLES TO WHICH EXCEPTION DOES NOT APPLY

7.9    LIMITATION TO FIDUCIARY FUNCTIONS

7.10    “SETTLOR EXCEPTION”

7.11    “LIABILITY EXCEPTION”

7.12    OTHER FIDUCIARY EXCEPTION ISSUES

7.13    APPLICATION TO LAW FIRMS

CHAPTER 8:    CLIENT AGENTS/CONSULTANTS

8.1    INTRODUCTION

8.2    CHARACTERIZATION OF CLIENT AGENTS

8.3    CLIENT AGENTS NECESSARY TO TRANSMIT COMMUNICATIONS

8.4    DEFINING THE LEVEL OF NECESSITY

8.5    CLIENT AGENTS WITHIN PRIVILEGE PROTECTION

8.6    CLIENT AGENTS OUTSIDE PRIVILEGE PROTECTION

8.7    IMPORTANCE OF A CHOICE OF LAW ANALYSIS

8.8    “FUNCTIONAL EQUIVALENT” DOCTRINE

8.9    CHANGE IN AGENTS’ ROLES

8.10    CLIENT AGENTS VERSUS LAWYER AGENTS

8.11    APPLICATION OF THE WORK PRODUCT DOCTRINE

8.12    IMPORTANCE OF EDUCATING CLIENTS

CHAPTER 9:    LAWYERS

9.1    INTRODUCTION

9.2    NONLAWYERS

9.3    PATENT AGENTS

9.4    NONLAWYERS THOUGHT BY CLIENTS TO BE LAWYERS

9.5    LAWYERS NOT ABLE TO PRACTICE LAW

9.6    MULTIJURISDICTIONAL PRACTICE ISSUES

9.7    IN HOUSE LAWYERS

9.8    FOREIGN NONLAWYERS

9.9    FOREIGN LAWYERS

9.10    WORK PRODUCT DOCTRINE CONTRASTED

CHAPTER 10:    LAWYER AGENTS/CONSULTANTS

10.1    INTRODUCTION

10.2    PRIVILEGE PROTECTION FOR LAWYER AGENTS

10.3    COMPARISON TO CLIENT AGENTS

10.4    LAWYER AGENTS TRANSMITTING PRIVILEGED COMMUNICATIONS

10.5    OTHER LAWYER AGENTS

10.6    SCOPE OF AVAILABLE PROTECTION

10.7    PROTECTED LAWYER AGENTS VERSUS UNPROTECTED CLIENT AGENTS

10.8    NONDISPOSITIVE FACTORS

10.9    “NEED” FOR THE AGENT’S ASSISTANCE

10.10    BEST PRACTICES

10.11    LAWYER AGENTS INSIDE THE PRIVILEGE

10.12    LAWYER AGENTS OUTSIDE THE PRIVILEGE

10.13    “MORPHING” OF A LAWYER AGENT ROLE

10.14    LAWYER AGENTS PLAYING DUAL ROLES

10.15    NON-TESTIFYING EXPERTS

10.16    LAWYER AGENT’S ROLE IN WORK PRODUCT DOCTRINE PROTECTION

CHAPTER 11:    UNPROTECTED BACKGROUND INFORMATION

11.1    INTRODUCTION

11.2    COMMUNICATIONS ABOUT BACKGROUND INFORMATION

11.3    FACT OF THE REPRESENTATION

11.4    GENERAL SUBJECT MATTER OF THE REPRESENTATION

11.5    UNPROTECTED FEE INFORMATION

11.6    PROTECTED FEE INFORMATION

11.7    LAWYERS’ BILLS

11.8    BACKGROUND FACTS ABOUT ATTORNEY-CLIENT COMMUNICATIONS

11.9    SUBJECT MATTER OF ATTORNEY-CLIENT COMMUNICATIONS

CHAPTER 12:    CONTENT AND “COMMUNICATION” ELEMENT

12.1    INTRODUCTION

12.2    APPROACH OF THIS OUTLINE

12.3    FORMS OF TRANSMISSION AND SUBSTANCE

12.4    CLIENTS’ ACTS

12.5    LAWYERS’ ACTS

CHAPTER 13:    CONTENT: LEGAL ADVICE REQUIREMENT

13.1    INTRODUCTION

13.2    COMMON MISPERCEPTIONS ABOUT THE PRIVILEGE

13.3    COMMUNICATIONS DESERVING PRIVILEGE PROTECTION

13.4    BASIC PRINCIPLES

13.5    ANALYZING EACH COMMUNICATION

13.6    ANALYZING EACH COMMUNICATION

CHAPTER 14:    ANALYZING THE LAWYER’S ROLE

14.1    INTRODUCTION

14.2    LAWYER’S ROLE IS NOT DISPOSITIVE

14.3    LAWYERS INVOLVED IN INVESTIGATIONS

14.4    LAWYERS INVOLVED IN OTHER MATTERS

14.5    IN HOUSE LAWYERS

14.6    LAWYERS AS CONDUITS TO OR FROM CLIENTS

14.7    WORK PRODUCT

CHAPTER 15:    BUSINESS AND OTHER NONLEGAL ADVICE

15.1    INTRODUCTION

15.2    DISTINGUISHING BETWEEN LEGAL AND BUSINESS ADVICE

15.3    APPLYING THE “PRIMARY PURPOSE” TEST

15.4    WIDESPREAD INTRACORPORATE CIRCULATION

15.5    OTHER TYPES OF NONLEGAL ADVICE

CHAPTER 16:    CLIENT-TO-LAWYER COMMUNICATIONS

16.1    INTRODUCTION

16.2    UNCOMMUNICATED CLIENT DOCUMENTS

16.3    CLIENT-TO-CLIENT COMMUNICATIONS

16.4    CLIENT’S EXPLICIT OR IMPLICIT REQUEST FOR LEGAL ADVICE: INTRODUCTION

16.5    UNPROTECTED HISTORICAL FACTS

16.6    PRE-EXISTING DOCUMENTS RECEIVED FROM CLIENT

16.7    CLIENT’S NON-SUBSTANTIVE COMMUNICATIONS

16.8    CLIENT COMMUNICATIONS RELAYING HISTORICAL FACTS

16.9    REVIEW OF DRAFT DOCUMENTS

16.10    DRAFTS CLIENTS INTEND TO DISCLOSE

16.11    CLIENTS’ ACTS AFTER ADVICE IS RECEIVED

CHAPTER 17:    LAWYER-TO-CLIENT COMMUNICATIONS

17.1    INTRODUCTION

17.2    UNCOMMUNICATED LAWYER DOCUMENTS

17.3    LAWYER-TO-LAWYER COMMUNICATIONS

17.4    RULES GOVERNING LAWYER-TO-CLIENT COMMUNICATIONS

17.5    LAWYERS’ REQUESTS FOR FACTS FROM CLIENTS

17.6    HISTORICAL FACTS

17.7    HISTORICAL FACTS WITHIN THE LAWYER’S KNOWLEDGE

17.8    PRE-EXISTING DOCUMENTS THAT LAWYERS GIVE TO THEIR CLIENTS

17.9    LAWYER’S DOCUMENTS RELAYING FACTS TO CLIENTS

17.10    DRAFTS

17.11    PROTECTION FOR LAWYER-CREATED DRAFTS

17.12    LEGAL ADVICE: GENERAL RULES

17.13    PROTECTED AND UNPROTECTED LAWYER ADVICE

17.14    LAWYER’S ACTIONS

17.15    EXPECTATION OF DISCLOSURE

17.16    DISCOVERY ABOUT DISCOVERY

17.17    WORK PRODUCT PROTECTION

CHAPTER 18:    THE CRIME-FRAUD EXCEPTION

18.1    INTRODUCTION

18.2    APPLICABILITY TO FUTURE WRONGDOING

18.3    WRONGDOING COVERED BY THE EXCEPTION

18.4    CONNECTION BETWEEN THE WRONGDOING AND THE COMMUNICATION

18.5    KNOWLEDGE OF THE WRONGDOING

18.6    APPLYING THE EXCEPTION

18.7    PROCESS FOR APPLYING THE EXCEPTION

18.8    LATER ATTEMPTS TO ESTABLISH THE EXCEPTION

18.9    FIRST STEP: IN CAMERA REVIEW

18.10    SECOND STEP: EVIDENCE AND HEARING

18.11    STANDARD FOR OVERCOMING THE PRIVILEGE

18.12    EXPANSION OF THE EXCEPTION

CHAPTER 19:    PRESENCE OF THIRD PARTIES

19.1    INTRODUCTION

19.2    “EXPECTATION OF CONFIDENTIALITY” ELEMENT

19.3    CHARACTERIZING THIRD PARTIES’ INVOLVEMENT

19.4    EXPECTATION OF CONFIDENTIALITY VERSUS WAIVER

19.5    SLOPPY HANDLING OF PRIVILEGED COMMUNICATIONS

19.6    UNINVITED THIRD PARTIES

19.7    INVITED THIRD PARTIES

19.8    INTRACORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS WITH CORPORATE EMPLOYEES

19.9    INVITED CLIENT AGENTS

19.10    FAMILY MEMBERS

19.11    INVITED LAWYER AGENTS

19.12    ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONS

19.13    PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS ON WORK COMPUTERS

19.14    SLOPPY DESTRUCTION OF PRIVILEGED COMMUNICATIONS

19.15    WORK PRODUCT DOCTRINE

CHAPTER 20:    THE JOINT DEFENSE/COMMON INTEREST DOCTRINE

20.1    INTRODUCTION

20.2    COMMON INTEREST DOCTRINE VERSUS JOINT REPRESENTATIONS

20.3    HISTORY OF THE COMMON INTEREST DOCTRINE

20.4    NATURE OF THE PROTECTION

20.5    LITIGATION ELEMENT

20.6    CREATION OF THE PROTECTION

20.7    TYPES OF COMMON INTEREST SUPPORTING AGREEMENT

20.8    DEGREE OF COMMONALITY REQUIRED

20.9    LAWYERS’ INVOLVEMENT

20.10    COURTS’ APPLICATION OF THE DOCTRINE

20.11    EXAMPLES OF ASSERTIONS OF THE DOCTRINE

20.12    DANGER OF A SUBJECT MATTER WAIVER

20.13    APPLICABILITY IN THE INSURANCE CONTEXT

20.14    LATER ADVERSITY AMONG PARTICIPANTS

20.15    DISCOVERY ABOUT DISCOVERY

20.16    WORK PRODUCT

CHAPTER 21:    INTENT TO DISCLOSE CONTENT

21.1    INTRODUCTION

21.2    INTENT TO DISCLOSE VERSUS WAIVER

21.3    DOCUMENTS

21.4    INFORMATION

21.5    COMMUNICATIONS

21.6    RELATED COMMUNICATIONS

21.7    PRELIMINARY DRAFTS OF DOCUMENTS

21.8    PRIVILEGED DOCUMENTS THAT WILL BE USED AT TRIAL

21.9    WORK PRODUCT

CHAPTER 22:    INTERNAL CORPORATE INVESTIGATIONS AND INSURANCE

22.1    INTRODUCTION

22.2    EARLY DECISION IN THE INVESTIGATION CONTEXT

22.3    COMMUNICATIONS ABOUT THE INVESTIGATION

22.4    FACTS AND LOGISTICS OF THE INVESTIGATION

22.5    INTERNAL CORPORATE INVESTIGATIONS: INTRODUCTION

22.6    INITIATION OF THE INVESTIGATION

22.7    COURSE OF THE INVESTIGATION

22.8    USE OF THE INVESTIGATION

22.9    “MORPHED” INVESTIGATIONS WITH CHANGING MOTIVATIONS

22.10    PARALLEL OR SUCCESSIVE INVESTIGATIONS

22.11    EXAMPLES OF INTERNAL CORPORATE INVESTIGATIONS

22.12    WAIVER IN THE INVESTIGATION CONTEXT

22.13    WORK PRODUCT IN THE INVESTIGATION CONTEXT

22.14    PRIVILEGE PROTECTION IN THE INSURANCE CONTEXT

CHAPTER 23:    WAIVER OF THE PRIVILEGE

23.1    INTRODUCTION

23.2    PRIVILEGE CAN BE UNAVAILABLE OR LOST

23.3    NO NEED FOR CLIENT INTENT TO WAIVE

23.4    WAIVER CHAPTERS OF THIS OUTLINE

CHAPTER 24:    POWER TO WAIVE THE PRIVILEGE

24.1    INTRODUCTION

24.2    INDIVIDUALS AND THEIR SUCCESSORS

24.3    JOINTLY REPRESENTED CLIENTS

24.4    JOINT DEFENSE/COMMON INTEREST PARTICIPANTS

24.5    GOVERNMENT CLIENTS

24.6    CORPORATE CLIENTS

24.7    OTHER CLIENTS

24.8    LAWYERS

24.9    OTHERS

24.10    WORK PRODUCT

CHAPTER 25:    EXPRESS WAIVER

25.1    INTRODUCTION

25.2    DIFFERENT TYPES OF EXPRESS WAIVERS

25.3    DISCLOSURE DOES NOT AUTOMATICALLY WAIVE THE PRIVILEGE

25.4    HOW WAIVER CAN OCCUR

25.5    DISCLOSURE VERSUS MERE ACCESS TO A COMMUNICATION

25.6    DISCLOSURE OF NON-PRIVILEGED COMMUNICATIONS OR FACTS

25.7    DISCLOSURE OF THE “GIST” OF A PRIVILEGED COMMUNICATION

25.8    VOLUNTARY VERSUS COMPELLED DISCLOSURE

25.9    DISCLOSING PARTY’S DISCLAIMER OF A WAIVER

25.10    EFFECT OF A CONFIDENTIALITY WARNING

25.11    EFFECT OF A CONFIDENTIALITY AGREEMENT

25.12    COURT ORDERS PURPORTING TO ALLOW SELECTIVE WAIVERS

25.13    NORMAL EFFECT OF AN EXPRESS WAIVER

CHAPTER 26:    INTENTIONAL EXPRESS WAIVER

26.1    INTRODUCTION

26.2    ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF DISCLOSURE

26.3    DISCLOSURE IN THE LITIGATION CONTEXT

26.4    DISCLOSURE TO THE GOVERNMENT: STATUTES

26.5    DISCLOSURE TO THE GOVERNMENT: COMMON LAW

26.6    FEDERAL RULE OF EVIDENCE 502: SELECTIVE WAIVERS

26.7    FACTS DISCLOSED TO THE GOVERNMENT

26.8    CORPORATE NEGOTIATIONS OR TRANSACTIONS

26.9    INTRACORPORATE DISCLOSURE

26.10    CORPORATE AND OTHER CLIENT AGENTS

26.11    DISCLOSURE TO LAWYER AGENTS

26.12    OTHER RELATIONSHIPS

26.13    DISCLOSURE IN OTHER CONTEXTS

26.14    SELECTIVE WAIVERS PRE- AND POST-RULE 502

26.15    SUBJECT MATTER WAIVER

26.16    WORK PRODUCT

CHAPTER 27:    INADVERTENT EXPRESS WAIVER

27.1    INTRODUCTION

27.2    PRESENCE OF THIRD PARTIES ELEMENT

27.3    “INTENT TO DISCLOSE” ELEMENT

27.4    ETHICS ISSUES

27.5    UNAUTHORIZED DISCLOSURE

27.6    POST-PRODUCTION PRIVILEGE ASSERTIONS

27.7    MEANING OF “INADVERTENT”

27.8    DOCUMENT PRODUCTIONS PRE-RULE 502

27.9    FEDERAL RULE OF EVIDENCE 502

27.10    APPLICATION OF RULE 502

27.11    INADVERTENCE FACTOR

27.12    REASONABLE STEPS TO PREVENT DISCLOSURE

27.13    NUMBER OF DISCLOSURES

27.14    PROMPTNESS OF REMEDIAL MEASURES

27.15    OTHER FACTORS

27.16    NON-WAIVER: CLAWBACK AGREEMENTS AND COURT ORDERS

27.17    THE CLAWBACK DILEMMA

27.18    OTHER INADVERTENT DISCLOSURE

27.19    EFFECT OF AN INADVERTENT DISCLOSURE

27.20    SUBJECT MATTER WAIVER

27.21    WORK PRODUCT

CHAPTER 28:    IMPLIED WAIVER

28.1    INTRODUCTION

28.2    IMPLIED VERSUS EXPRESS WAIVER

28.3    OTHER UNINTENTIONAL DISCLOSURES

28.4    DIFFERENCE BETWEEN IMPLIED WAIVER AND A LITIGANT’S FAILURE OF PROOF IN SUPPORTING A PRIVILEGE CLAIM

28.5    RULE 502

28.6    THE “AT ISSUE” DOCTRINE

28.7    CLIENTS’ ATTACKS ON LAWYERS AND LEGAL ADVICE

28.8    THIRD PARTIES’ ATTACKS ON LAWYERS

28.9    LAWYERS’ ATTACKS ON CLIENTS

28.10    CLIENT CLAIMS FOR ATTORNEY FEES

28.11    RELIANCE ON LEGAL ADVICE AS AN AFFIRMATIVE DEFENSE

28.12    RELIANCE ON LEGAL ADVICE IN OTHER CONTEXTS

28.13    DEPOSITION REFERENCES TO PRIVILEGED COMMUNICATIONS

28.14    CLIENTS’ DENIAL OF COMMUNICATIONS WITH A LAWYER

28.15    CLIENTS’ DESIGNATION OF A LAWYER AS A WITNESS

28.16    RELIANCE ON LEGAL ADVICE OUTSIDE COURT PROCEEDINGS

28.17    PRIVILEGED COMMUNICATIONS USED AT TRIAL

28.18    “AT ISSUE” WAIVER

28.19    FEDERAL RULE OF EVIDENCE 612

28.20    EFFECT OF IMPLIED WAIVER

28.21    SCOPE OF IMPLIED WAIVER

28.22    WORK PRODUCT

CHAPTER 29:    THE “AT ISSUE” DOCTRINE

29.1    INTRODUCTION

29.2    CONFUSION ABOUT THE “AT ISSUE” DOCTRINE

29.3    NATURE OF THE “AT ISSUE” WAIVER DOCTRINE

29.4    SPECTRUM OF JUDICIAL APPROACHES

29.5    HEARN DOCTRINE AND RELEVANT FACTORS

29.6    HEARN DOCTRINE: ASSERTIONS OF KNOWLEDGE

29.7    HEARN DOCTRINE: IGNORANCE

29.8    HEARN DOCTRINE: ACTION OR INACTION

29.9    THE FARAGHER/ELLERTH DEFENSE

29.10    HEARN DOCTRINE: OTHER EXAMPLES

29.11    ABILITY TO ABANDON ASSERTIONS OR DEFENSES

29.12    EFFECT OF AN “AT ISSUE” WAIVER

29.13    SCOPE OF POSSIBLE SUBJECT MATTER WAIVER

29.14    WORK PRODUCT DOCTRINE

CHAPTER 30:    SUBJECT MATTER WAIVER

30.1    INTRODUCTION

30.2    FAIRNESS OF A SUBJECT MATTER WAIVER

30.3    NECESSITY OF A WAIVER

30.4    INTENTIONAL EXPRESS WAIVER: JUDICIAL SETTING

30.5    AVOIDING A SUBJECT MATTER WAIVER

30.6    INTENTIONAL EXPRESS WAIVER: NON-JUDICIAL SETTING

30.7    INADVERTENT EXPRESS WAIVER UNDER RULE 502

30.8    IMPLIED WAIVERS, “AT ISSUE” WAIVERS, AND RULE 612

30.9    WORK PRODUCT DOCTRINE

CHAPTER 31:    SCOPE OF A SUBJECT MATTER WAIVER

31.1    INTRODUCTION

31.2    GENERAL APPROACH

31.3    TYPES OF SCOPE: HORIZONTAL AND TEMPORAL

31.4    SCOPE OF INTENTIONAL EXPRESS WAIVERS

31.5    SCOPE OF INADVERTENT EXPRESS WAIVERS

31.6    SCOPE OF IMPLIED WAIVERS

31.7    SCOPE OF “AT ISSUE” WAIVERS

31.8    WORK PRODUCT DOCTRINE

CHAPTER 32:    WAIVER: NEW RULES AND PUBLIC POLICY DEBATES

32.1    INTRODUCTION

32.2    FEDERAL RULES AND POST-PRODUCTION PRIVILEGE CLAIMS

32.3    FEDERAL RULE OF EVIDENCE 502

32.4    FEDERAL RULES GOVERNING TESTIFYING EXPERTS

32.5    GOVERNMENTAL REQUESTS FOR WAIVER OF PROTECTIONS

32.6    PROPOSALS ON SELECTIVE WAIVER BY CORPORATIONS

32.7    CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 33:    WORK PRODUCT DOCTRINE: HISTORIC PERSPECTIVE

33.1    INTRODUCTION

33.2    COMMON LAW ANTECEDENTS

33.3    FIRST RECOGNIZED IN HICKMAN V. TAYLOR

33.4    FEDERAL RULES OF CIVIL PROCEDURE

33.5    CONTINUING FEDERAL COMMON LAW PRINCIPLES

33.6    NAMING THE DOCTRINE

33.7    COMPARISON TO THE ATTORNEY-CLIENT PRIVILEGE

33.8    AVAILABILITY OF BOTH PROTECTIONS

33.9    DIFFERING APPLICATIONS OF THE WORK PRODUCT DOCTRINE

CHAPTER 34:    CREATING AND ASSERTING WORK PRODUCT PROTECTION

34.1    INTRODUCTION

34.2    CREATION OF PROTECTED WORK PRODUCT

34.3    LAWYER NEED NOT BE INVOLVED

34.4    ADVANTAGES OF A LAWYER’S INVOLVEMENT

34.5    CLIENT AND LAWYER REPRESENTATIVES

34.6    FRIENDLY THIRD PARTIES’ ROLE

34.7    NON-TESTIFYING EXPERTS

34.8    TESTIFYING EXPERTS

34.9    PARTIES’ ASSERTION OF WORK PRODUCT PROTECTION

34.10    NON-PARTIES’ ASSERTION OF WORK PRODUCT PROTECTION

34.11    OWNERSHIP OF LAWYERS’ FILES

CHAPTER 35:    CONTEXT AND TIMING OF WORK PRODUCT

35.1    INTRODUCTION

35.2    PRIMACY OF CONTEXT OVER CONTENT

35.3    IRRELEVANCE OF AN ATTORNEY-CLIENT RELATIONSHIP

35.4    IRRELEVANCE OF COMMUNICATION

35.5    IRRELEVANCE OF CONFIDENTIALITY

35.6    PRESENCE OF NON-ADVERSE THIRD PARTIES

35.7    JOINT DEFENSE/COMMON INTEREST AGREEMENTS

35.8    CRITICAL ROLE OF TIMING

35.9    WORK PRODUCT INTENDED FOR USE AT DEPOSITIONS

35.10    WORK PRODUCT INTENDED FOR USE AT TRIAL

CHAPTER 36:    “LITIGATION” ELEMENT

36.1    INTRODUCTIO

36.2    RELATIONSHIP OF LITIGATION, ANTICIPATION, AND MOTIVATION

36.3    JUDICIAL PROCEEDINGS

36.4    BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDINGS

36.5    NON-JUDICIAL PROCEEDINGS

36.6    GOVERNMENT INVESTIGATIONS

36.7    ATTORNEY-CLIENT PRIVILEGE

CHAPTER 37:    “ANTICIPATION OF LITIGATION” ELEMENT

37.1    INTRODUCTION

37.2    LITIGATION AND “ANTICIPATION” OF LITIGATION

37.3    SUBJECTIVE AND OBJECTIVE ANTICIPATION

37.4    MOTIVATION TO SETTLE OR AVOID LITIGATION

37.5    REQUIREMENT OF A SPECIFIC IDENTIFIABLE CLAIM

37.6    DEGREE OF ANTICIPATION OF LITIGATION

37.7    DATE AND DURATION OF ANTICIPATION

37.8    TRIGGER EVENTS FOR REQUIRED ANTICIPATION

37.9    RISK OF POSSIBLE SPOLIATION CLAIMS

CHAPTER 38:    “MOTIVATION” ELEMENT

38.1    INTRODUCTION

38.2    RELATIONSHIP TO ANTICIPATION OF LITIGATION ELEMENT

38.3    NECESSITY OF MEETING THE MOTIVATION STANDARD

38.4    DOCUMENTS CREATED AFTER LITIGATION ENDS

38.5    DUAL MEANING OF THE “PRIMARY PURPOSE” TEST

38.6    LIMITING PROTECTION TO DOCUMENTS THAT AID IN LITIGATION

38.7    DOCUMENTS CREATED TO SATISFY EXTERNAL REQUIREMENTS

38.8    DOCUMENTS CREATED TO SATISFY INTERNAL REQUIREMENTS

38.9    DOCUMENTS CREATED IN THE ORDINARY COURSE OF BUSINESS

38.10    COURTS’ REVIEW OF A DOCUMENT’S “FOUR CORNERS”

38.11    EXTRINSIC EVIDENCE SUCH AS AFFIDAVITS

38.12    PROTECTION FOR QUALITATIVELY DIFFERENT DOCUMENTS

38.13    “MORPHED” INVESTIGATIONS WITH CHANGING MOTIVATIONS

38.14    SEPARATE PARALLEL OR SUCCESSIVE INVESTIGATIONS

38.15    THE ADLMAN “BECAUSE OF” TEST

CHAPTER 39:    WORK PRODUCT CONTENT

39.1    INTRODUCTION

39.2    INTANGIBLE WORK PRODUCT

39.3    BACKGROUND FACTS ABOUT THE CREATION OF WORK PRODUCT

39.4    WORK PRODUCT PROTECTION FOR NON-SUBSTANTIVE DOCUMENTS

39.5    TYPES OF WORK PRODUCT

39.6    FIDUCIARY AND CRIME-FRAUD EXCEPTIONS

CHAPTER 40:    FACT WORK PRODUCT

40.1    INTRODUCTION

40.2    INTANGIBLE AND NON-SUBSTANTIVE WORK PRODUCT

40.3    NAMING THE PROTECTION

40.4    HISTORICAL FACTS IN THE WORK PRODUCT CONTEXT

40.5    FACTS OBTAINED FROM OR GIVEN TO CLIENTS

40.6    FACTS OBTAINED FROM OR GIVEN TO THIRD PARTIES

40.7    CONTEMPORANEOUS DOCUMENTS

40.8    LAWYERS’ COMMUNICATIONS WITH THIRD PARTIES

40.9    EXAMPLES OF PROTECTED FACT WORK PRODUCT

40.10    RETAINERS/FEE AGREEMENTS

40.11    LAWYERS’ BILLS

40.12    WITNESS INTERVIEW NOTES AND SUMMARIES

40.13    WITNESS STATEMENTS

40.14    WITNESS AFFIDAVITS

40.15    SURVEILLANCE VIDEOTAPES

40.16    CORPORATIONS’ LOSS RESERVE FIGURES

40.17    OTHER EXAMPLES OF WORK PRODUCT

40.18    DOCUMENTS NOT DESERVING WORK PRODUCT PROTECTION

CHAPTER 41:    OPINION WORK PRODUCT

41.1    INTRODUCTION

41.2    COMPARISON TO OTHER PROTECTIONS

41.3    ERRONEOUS LIMITATION OF PROTECTION

41.4    PARTICIPANTS WHOSE OPINION CAN BE PROTECTED

41.5    DOCUMENTS CONTAINING OPINION

41.6    DOCUMENTS REFLECTING OPINION

41.7    INTANGIBLE OPINION WORK PRODUCT

41.8    LAWYERS’ COMMUNICATIONS WITH THIRD PARTIES

CHAPTER 42:    FACTS REFLECTING THE LAWYER’S OPINION

42.1    INTRODUCTION

42.2    INTRINSICALLY UNPROTECTED DOCUMENTS REFLECTING OPINION

42.3    CLIENT REPRESENTATIVES

42.4    HISTORY OF THE SPORCK DOCTRINE

42.5    GENERAL RULES: INTRODUCTION

42.6    EQUAL AVAILABILITY TO THE ADVERSARY

42.7    SELECTION AS REFLECTING PROTECTED OPINION

42.8    TIMING OF DISCLOSURE

42.9    LAWYERS’ SELECTION OF DOCUMENTS

42.10    LAWYERS’ SELECTION OF WITNESSES

42.11    LAWYERS’ SELECTION OF INFORMATION FOR DATABASES

42.12    CONTENTION INTERROGATORIES AND RULE 30(B)(6) DEPOSITIONS

42.13    OTHER EXAMPLES

CHAPTER 43:    PROTECTION FOR INTERNAL CORPORATE INVESTIGATIONS

43.1    INTRODUCTION

43.2    INTERNAL CORPORATE INVESTIGATIONS

43.3    INITIATION OF THE INVESTIGATION

43.4    COURSE OF THE INVESTIGATION

43.5    USE OF THE INVESTIGATION

43.6    “MORPHED” INVESTIGATIONS WITH CHANGING MOTIVATIONS

43.7    SEPARATE OR SUCCESSIVE INTERNAL INVESTIGATIONS

43.8    EXAMPLES OF INTERNAL CORPORATE INVESTIGATIONS

43.9    WAIVER IN THE INVESTIGATION CONTEXT

43.10    INSURANCE CONTEXT: INTRODUCTION

43.11    FIRST- AND THIRD-PARTY INSURANCE CONTEXTS

43.12    FIRST-PARTY INSURANCE CONTEXT

43.13    THIRD-PARTY INSURANCE CONTEXT

CHAPTER 44:    OVERCOMING WORK PRODUCT PROTECTION

44.1    INTRODUCTION

44.2    COMPARISON WITH THE ATTORNEY-CLIENT PRIVILEGE

44.3    DURATION OF THE PROTECTION

44.4    OVERCOMING PROTECTION FOR STATEMENTS

44.5    FEDERAL RULE OF EVIDENCE 612

44.6    EXCULPATORY EVIDENCE IN A CRIMINAL CASE

44.7    APPLICATION OF THE FIDUCIARY EXCEPTION

44.8    APPLICATION OF THE CRIME-FRAUD EXCEPTION

44.9    WRONGFULLY CREATED FACT WORK PRODUCT

44.10    OVERCOMING PROTECTION FOR NON-TESTIFYING EXPERTS

44.11    OVERCOMING PROTECTION APPLICABLE TO TESTIFYING EXPERTS

44.12    PROCEDURAL ISSUES

CHAPTER 45:    OVERCOMING FACT WORK PRODUCT PROTECTION

45.1    INTRODUCTION

45.2    COMPARISON WITH THE ATTORNEY-CLIENT PRIVILEGE AND GENERAL RULES

45.3    “SUBSTANTIAL NEED” FACTOR

45.4    “SUBSTANTIAL EQUIVALENT” FACTOR

45.5    “UNDUE HARDSHIP” FACTOR

45.6    APPLICATION TO DATABASES

45.7    APPLICATION TO SURVEILLANCE VIDEOTAPES

45.8    WITHHOLDING LITIGANT’S BURDEN OF PRODUCING DOCUMENTS

45.9    ROLE OF THE ADVERSARY’S DILIGENCE

CHAPTER 46:    OVERCOMING OPINION WORK PRODUCT PROTECTION

46.1    INTRODUCTION

46.2    FEDERAL AND STATE RULES

46.3    DEGREE OF PROTECTION

46.4    APPLICATION OF THE PROTECTION

46.5    FEDERAL RULE OF EVIDENCE 612

CHAPTER 47:    POWER TO WAIVE WORK PRODUCT PROTECTION

47.1    INTRODUCTION

47.2    CLIENTS’ AND LAWYERS’ ABILITY TO WAIVE PROTECTION

47.3    THIRD PARTIES’ POWER TO WAIVE PROTECTION

47.4    SIMILARITIES TO THE ATTORNEY-CLIENT PRIVILEGE

47.5    DIFFERENCES FROM THE ATTORNEY-CLIENT PRIVILEGE

CHAPTER 48:    INTENTIONAL, INADVERTENT, OR IMPLIED WAIVER

48.1    INTRODUCTION

48.2    INTENTIONAL DISCLOSURE IN THE CORPORATE CONTEXT

48.3    INTENTIONAL DISCLOSURE TO THE GOVERNMENT

48.4    INTENTIONAL DISCLOSURE TO OTHER THIRD PARTIES

48.5    IMPORTANCE OF CONFIDENTIALITY AGREEMENTS

48.6    ROLE OF THE COMMON INTEREST DOCTRINE

48.7    WAIVER OF PRIVILEGE BUT NOT WORK PRODUCT PROTECTION

48.8    EFFECT OF RULE 502 ON INTENTIONAL EXPRESS WAIVER

48.9    INADVERTENT EXPRESS WAIVER

48.10    IMPLIED WAIVER

48.11    “AT ISSUE” DOCTRINE

CHAPTER 49:    DISCLOSURE OF WORK PRODUCT TO AND BY EXPERTS

49.1    INTRODUCTION

49.2    DISCLOSURE TO NON-TESTIFYING EXPERTS

49.3    DISCLOSURE BY NON-TESTIFYING EXPERTS

49.4    NON-TESTIFYING EXPERTS PLAYING MULTIPLE ROLES

49.5    TESTIFYING EXPERTS’ DOCUMENTS AND COMMUNICATIONS

49.6    FACT WORK PRODUCT DISCLOSED TO TESTIFYING EXPERTS

49.7    OPINION WORK PRODUCT DISCLOSED TO TESTIFYING EXPERTS

49.8    TESTIFYING EXPERTS PLAYING MULTIPLE ROLES IN THE SAME CASE

49.9    TESTIFYING EXPERTS WITH MULTIPLE ROLES IN DIFFERENT CASES

49.10    SCOPE OF WAIVER

CHAPTER 50:    SUBJECT MATTER WAIVER: APPLICABILITY AND SCOPE

50.1    INTRODUCTION

50.2    COMPARISON TO THE ATTORNEY-CLIENT PRIVILEGE

50.3    WAIVER OF THE PRIVILEGE BUT NOT WORK PRODUCT DOCTRINE PROTECTION

50.4    SUBJECT MATTER WAIVER IN THE WORK PRODUCT CONTEXT

50.5    EXAMPLES OF SUBJECT MATTER WAIVER

50.6    SCOPE OF WAIVER

50.7    WAIVER OF FACT BUT NOT OPINION PROTECTION

50.8    THE FARAGHER/ELLERTH DOCTRINE

50.9    APPLICATION IN THE PATENT CONTEXT

CHAPTER 51:    ASSERTING AND LITIGATING THE PROTECTIONS    

CHAPTER 52:    SOURCE AND CHOICE OF ATTORNEY-CLIENT PRIVILEGE LAW

52.1    INTRODUCTION

52.2    ADDRESSING ONLY ONE TYPE OF PROTECTION

52.3    CHOICE OF PRIVILEGE LAW

52.4    SOURCE OF PRIVILEGE LAW

52.5    CHOICE OF PRIVILEGE LAW IN STATE COURTS

52.6    CHOICE OF PRIVILEGE LAW IN FEDERAL COURTS

52.7    CHOICE OF PRIVILEGE LAW IN FEDERAL DIVERSITY CASES

52.8    FOREIGN COMMUNICATIONS AND PRIVILEGE LAW

52.9    CHOICE OF PRIVILEGE LAW IN ARBITRATIONS

CHAPTER 53:    SOURCE AND CHOICE OF WORK PRODUCT LAW

53.1    INTRODUCTION

53.2    ADDRESSING ONLY ONE TYPE OF PROTECTION

53.3    SOURCE OF WORK PRODUCT LAW—STATE COURTS

53.4    SOURCE OF WORK PRODUCT LAW—FEDERAL COURTS

53.5    VARIATIONS IN WORK PRODUCT LAW—FEDERAL COURTS

53.6    CHOICE OF WORK PRODUCT LAW

CHAPTER 54:    ASSERTING THE PROTECTIONS

54.1    INTRODUCTION

54.2    HORIZONTAL SCOPE OF LITIGANT’S DUTY

54.3    TEMPORAL SCOPE OF LITIGANT’S DUTY

54.4    DUTY TO OBJECT: TIMING

54.5    DUTY TO OBJECT: SPECIFICITY

54.6    REDACTION

54.7    EFFECT OF PARTY’S FAILURE TO OBJECT

CHAPTER 55:    PRIVILEGE LOGS

55.1    INTRODUCTION

55.2    FEDERAL AND STATE RULES

55.3    TIMING OF PRIVILEGE LOGS

55.4    REQUIRED DETAILS ABOUT WITHHELD DOCUMENTS

55.5    LOGGING ATTACHMENTS AND EMAIL

55.6    REQUIRED DETAILS ABOUT WITHHELD ORAL COMMUNICATIONS

55.7    CIRCUMSTANCES JUSTIFYING A LESS SPECIFIC LOG

55.8    COURTS’ TREATMENT OF PARTICULAR LOG PHRASES

55.9    CHALLENGING A WITHHOLDING LITIGANT’S PRIVILEGE LOG

55.10    LITIGANT’S FAILURE TO PROPERLY LOG WITHHELD DOCUMENTS

55.11    CORRECTING PRIVILEGE LOGS

55.12    RISK OF PROVIDING TOO MUCH INFORMATION

55.13    PRACTICAL TIPS AND SUGGESTED LANGUAGE

CHAPTER 56:    EVIDENTIARY SUPPORT

56.1    INTRODUCTION

56.2    TIMING OF REQUIREMENT FOR EVIDENTIARY SUPPORT

56.3    FOCUS ON THE FOUR CORNERS OF WITHHELD DOCUMENTS

56.4    GENERAL RULE REQUIRING EVIDENTIARY SUPPORT

56.5    SPECIFIC ASSERTIONS REQUIRING EVIDENTIARY SUPPORT

56.6    LAWYER REPRESENTATIONS

56.7    LEGAL MEMORANDA

56.8    AFFIDAVITS AND SIMILAR EVIDENCE

56.9    EFFECT OF FAILURE TO PROVIDE EVIDENTIARY SUPPORT

CHAPTER 57:    LITIGATING THE PROTECTIONS

57.1    INTRODUCTION

57.2    STANDING

57.3    ADVERSE INFERENCE

57.4    NARROWNESS OF THE PROTECTIONS

57.5    PRESUMPTIONS

57.6    RELATIONSHIP TO WAIVER

57.7    BURDEN OF PROOF: PRIVILEGE

57.8    BURDEN OF PROOF: WORK PRODUCT DOCTRINE

57.9    EFFECT OF PRIVILEGE HEADERS AND STAMPS

CHAPTER 58:    OTHER DISCOVERY ISSUES

58.1    INTRODUCTION

58.2    CONTENTION INTERROGATORIES

58.3    RULE 30(B)(6) DEPOSITIONS

58.4    DEPOSING LAWYERS

58.5    DISCOVERY ABOUT DISCOVERY

CHAPTER 59:    COURTS’ ROLE

59.1    INTRODUCTION

59.2    BIFURCATION OF PATENT AND OTHER CASES

59.3    WHO SHOULD DECIDE PRIVILEGE/WORK PRODUCT ISSUES

59.4    IN CAMERA REVIEW

59.5    COURTS’ QUESTIONABLE PROCEDURES

59.6    OTHER PROCEDURAL ISSUES

59.7    TRIAL COURTS’ DUTY TO PREPARE FOR APPELLATE REVIEW

CHAPTER 60:    APPELLATE REVIEW

60.1    INTRODUCTION

60.2    PREPARING FOR AN APPEAL

60.3    INTERLOCUTORY APPEALS IN FEDERAL COURTS

60.4    INTERLOCUTORY APPEALS IN STATE COURTS

60.5    APPELLATE STANDARD OF REVIEW IN FEDERAL COURTS

60.6    APPELLATE STANDARD OF REVIEW IN STATE COURTS

Authors

Author

Thomas E. Spahn

Thomas E. Spahn has practiced law as a commercial litigator with McGuireWoods since graduating magna cum laude from Yale University and receiving his J.D. from Yale Law School in 1977. He regularly advises a number of Fortune 500 companies on issues involving ethics, conflicts of interest, the attorney-client privilege, and corporate investigations.

Mr. Spahn has received the Virginia Law Foundation’s highest award for Continuing Legal Education efforts; a special commendation from the Virginia State Bar “in recognition of his outstanding service to the Bar”; and the Virginia Bar Association’s William B. Spong, Jr. Professionalism Award and Walker Award of Merit. He is a Member of the American Law Institute and a Fellow of both the American Bar Foundation and Virginia Law Foundation. He was also selected as the 2013 metro-Washington DC “Lawyer of the Year” for “Bet the Company Litigation” by The Best Lawyers in America.

In addition to authoring this book on the attorney-client privilege and the work product doctrine and the two-colume, nationally-scoped, The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner's Guide, Mr. Spahn has researched and written several editions of The Law of Defamation in Virginia, another Virginia CLE publication, and contributes chapters to several other Virginia CLE handbooks as well. He has also published a book on ethics issues facing Virginia in-house lawyers and written over 75 articles that have appeared in both Virginia and national publications. The ABA’s General Practice Section chose his article on Litigation Ethics in the Modern Age as one of the “Best Articles Published by the ABA” in 2004.

Since 1988, Mr. Spahn has spoken at more than 1,600 CLE programs throughout the United States and in several foreign countries. In March 2009, he was invited to Reykjavik, Iceland, to discuss an ethics issue on Iceland’s leading news and interview show. In July 2012, he was invited to Erbil, Iraq, to participate in a panel assisting the Kurdistan Bar Association in establishing ethics rules.

Mr. Spahn has served on the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility; on the Virginia State Bar Standing Committee on Legal Ethics; as the Reporter for the Committee that drafted Virginia’s ethics Rules; as Chairman of The Virginia Bar Association’s Professionalism Task Force and Commission on Professionalism; on the Committee that revised Virginia’s lawyer discipline rules; on the faculty for the Professionalism Course that all new Virginia lawyers attend; and on the Virginia Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee. After personally reading, summarizing, and categorizing over 1,600 Virginia Bar Legal Ethics Opinions, Mr. Spahn made his work available to the public online through his bio page on the McGuireWoods website.

Prices

A Virginia-Specific Summary Guide: The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine

Format Price
Print $90
Download $90
CD-ROM $90
USB Flash Drive $90
Both Print and Download $115
Both Print and CD-ROM $115
Both Print and USB Flash Drive $115
Purchase Options
  • Add to Cart
Related Products
  • The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner's Guide

    View Details
 Clear the Docket Essentials Seminars FacebookFriday