Attorney Privilege Issues: Avoiding the Problems Seminar Materials

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The U.S. Supreme Court has recognized that the attorney-client privilege is the oldest of the privileges for confidential communications known to the common law. Its purpose is clear: to effectively represent any client, the attorney must know all the facts, good and bad, and the client is more likely to share those facts if assured that they will not subsequently be disclosed. In recognition of its inherent antagonism with the justice system’s search for the truth, the privilege is not absolute, but rather contains many conditions and exceptions.

The work product doctrine is similar to the attorney-client privilege in its effect—certain matters are protected from disclosure—but nearly everything else about it is different. It is at once more limited in its reach, and more expansive in its coverage.

Most lawyers believe that they know enough about these two principles—until it’s too late. This publication provides you with a thorough understanding of the law in this area. More importantly, you’ll be able to recognize and avoid problems before they arise.

This comprehensive, stand-alone publication is direct from a November 2012 seminar. It is available as a PDF download; however, the user has a license to print the materials if this format is more desirable. Click here for more information on electronic books.

CONTENT SUMMARY

I. INTRODUCTION

II. THE ATTORNEY-CLIENT PRIVILEGE

        A. Scope of the Attorney-Client Privilege
        B. Legal Advice Versus Business Advice
        C. What is Not Covered by the Privilege
        D. Attorney’s Engagement Letters and Invoices
        E. Drafts of Documents Provided to Third Parties
        F. The Crime-Fraud Exception
        G. When a Corporation is the Client
        H. Communications With Former Employees
        I. Communications Between Parent Corporations and Subsidiaries
        J. Communications With Shareholders
        K. When a Partnership Is the Client
        L. The Party Asserting the Privilege Bears the Burden of Proof
        M. Waiver of the Attorney-Client Privilege
        N. Rule 502 of the Federal Rules of Evidence
        O. Waiver Issues and Expert Witnesses
        P. Privilege Issues and Consulting Experts
        Q. Kovel Agreements
        R. The Common Interest or Joint Defense Doctrine

III. THE ATTORNEY WORK PRODUCT PRIVILEGE

        A. The Scope of the Attorney Work Product Privilege
        B. Anticipation of Litigation
        C. Protection of Expert Witness Draft Reports
        D. Waiver of the Work Product Privilege
        E. Potential Waiver Issues When Documents are Provided to Outside Auditors
        F. Reserves for Claims
        G. Choice of Law in Federal Cases

IV. THE SELF-CRITICAL ANALYSIS PRIVILEGE

        A. The Purpose and History of the Self-Critical Analysis Privilege
        B. Elements of the Self-Critical Analysis Privilege
        C. Limitations of the Self-Critical Analysis Privilege
        D. Application of the Self-Critical Analysis Privilege in Virginia

Copyright © 2012 Virginia Law Foundation. All rights reserved.


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Table of Contents

Table of Contents

I. INTRODUCTION

II. THE ATTORNEY-CLIENT PRIVILEGE

        A. Scope of the Attorney-Client Privilege
        B. Legal Advice Versus Business Advice
        C. What is Not Covered by the Privilege
        D. Attorney’s Engagement Letters and Invoices
        E. Drafts of Documents Provided to Third Parties
        F. The Crime-Fraud Exception
        G. When a Corporation is the Client
        H. Communications With Former Employees
        I. Communications Between Parent Corporations and Subsidiaries
        J. Communications With Shareholders
        K. When a Partnership Is the Client
        L. The Party Asserting the Privilege Bears the Burden of Proof
        M. Waiver of the Attorney-Client Privilege
        N. Rule 502 of the Federal Rules of Evidence
        O. Waiver Issues and Expert Witnesses
        P. Privilege Issues and Consulting Experts
        Q. Kovel Agreements
        R. The Common Interest or Joint Defense Doctrine

III. THE ATTORNEY WORK PRODUCT PRIVILEGE

        A. The Scope of the Attorney Work Product Privilege
        B. Anticipation of Litigation
        C. Protection of Expert Witness Draft Reports
        D. Waiver of the Work Product Privilege
        E. Potential Waiver Issues When Documents are Provided to Outside Auditors
        F. Reserves for Claims
        G. Choice of Law in Federal Cases

IV. THE SELF-CRITICAL ANALYSIS PRIVILEGE

        A. The Purpose and History of the Self-Critical Analysis Privilege
        B. Elements of the Self-Critical Analysis Privilege
        C. Limitations of the Self-Critical Analysis Privilege
        D. Application of the Self-Critical Analysis Privilege in Virginia

Authors

Kevin M. Dinan

Robert K. Woo, Jr.

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