35th Annual Construction and Public Contracts Law Seminar Materials - SALE!

Publication Date: November 2014
Available Formats: Print or searchable PDF via download, USB Flash Drive, or CD-ROM
Pages: 559

Information

Topics Covered:

  • Confidentiality (Strength and Scope Of The Duty): Hypotheticals and Analysis
  • How To Prepare and Prosecute Mechanic’s Liens
  • How To Prepare and Prosecute Payment Bond Claims
  • I-64 Battlefield Boulevard Reconstruction
  • How To Prepare and Prosecute Claims Against the Federal Government
  • Best Practices For Construction Defect Litigation
  • Law Firm/In-House Counsel Relationships: Benefits, Pitfalls, Expectations, and Success Keys
  • How To Prepare a Construction Claim
  • Recent Developments In Construction and Public Contracts Law In Virginia

Inventory Reduction Sale - Now Just $10!

Virginia CLE® is clearing its shelves to make room for newer publications. Stock up and pay just one flat shipping fee. Offer good while supplies last. No other discounts apply. View all Clear The Docket Sale items.


This comprehensive, stand-alone publication is direct from a November 2014 seminar cosponsored with the Construction Law and Public Contracts Section of the Virginia State Bar.


Multiple Attorneys? Order by phone (800-979-8253) and receive a 10% discount on orders $400-$800 or a 20% discount on orders over $800. Any publication included in the order applies toward the discount.
Government Attorney? Receive a 30% discount on publications, and a 50% discount on most seminars.
New Virginia Lawyer? (less than three years) Receive a 25% discount on publications and most seminars.


Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CONFIDENTIALITY: PART I (STRENGTH AND SCOPE OF
THE DUTY) HYPOTHETICALS

Thomas E. Spahn

CONFIDENTIALITY: PART I (STRENGTH AND SCOPE OF
THE DUTY) HYPOTHETICALS AND ANALYSIS

Thomas E. Spahn

HOW TO PREPARE AND PROSECUTE MECHANIC’S LIENS
James R. Hart
Robert K. Richardson


    Preparation of the Lien Memorandum
    Threshold Issues


    I. Licensing, Statutory Amendments
        A. Introduction
        B. Licensing Information Required
        C. Broad Definition of “Contractor”
        D. Unlicensed Lien Claimants Barred
        E. License Category Thresholds
        F. Strict Compliance Appears Required

    II. MLA Notices
        A. Introduction
        B. Notice Requirement Amended to Include License Information
        C. Timing
        D. Verification

    III. Timing of Claim
        A. 90 Day Rule
        B. Punch List Work May Not Be Enough
        C. Demobilization

    IV. Lien Waivers
    
    V. Factoring Payment Issues Into Preparing the Lien Memorandum
    
    VI. The Importance of Title Work and the Complication of Leasehold
    Interests
    
    VII. Geographic Apportionment Issues
        A. Condominium Liens, Va. Code Ann. §43-3.A
        B. Site Work Liens
    
    VIII. Temporal Apportionment, 150 Day Rule and Retainage
        A. 150 Day Rule Under Va. Code Ann. §43-4

    IX. Condominium Issues
        A. Introduction
        B. Statutory Guidance
        C. Apportionment Takes Time

    X. Categorical Apportionment
    
    XI. Client Records

    Prosecuting the Mechanic’s Lien Claim

    I. Jury or Bench Trial?

    II. Title Work/Pitfalls
        A. Introduction
        B. Practical Suggestions
        C. Land Records Govern
        D. Identification of Necessary Parties Essential

    III. Timing
        A. Statute of Limitations
        B. Service Within One Year

    IV. Witnesses

HOW TO PREPARE AND PROSECUTE PAYMENT BOND CLAIMS
Hanna Lee Blake
Christopher G. Hill


    I. Payment Bonds Generally
    
    II. Payment Bond Claims on Public Projects
    
    III. Private Project Bonds
    
    IV. Prosecution of Claims
    
    V. Surety’s Defense of Claims

I-64 BATTLEFIELD BOULEVARD RECONSTRUCTION
Charles Bolyard, Jr.
Michael Prezioso

HOW TO PREPARE AND PROSECUTE CLAIMS AGAINST THE
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

Robert K. Cox
Henry D. Danforth
Leroy Trimbath

    I. Introduction

    II. So You Think You Have a Claim on Your Federal Construction
    Contract
        A. Recognizing and Preserving Your Contract Claim
        B. All Those Subcontractors and Suppliers With Claims
        C. Claim Versus a Request for Equitable Adjustment
        D. Preparing Your Claim

    III. Prosecuting Your Claim
        A. Your Claim Must Be in Writing and Submitted to the Contracting
        Officer
        B. A Routine Request for Payment is Not a Claim
        C. A Claim for Payment of Money Must Be for a Sum Certain
        D. You Must Request the Contracting Officer’s Final Decision on
        The Claim
        E. Claim Certification
        F. The Contracting Officer’s Final Decision

    IV. Appealing the Contracting Officer’s Final Decision
        A. The Final Decision is Final and Binding Unless You Timely
        Appeal
        B. Where and When Do I Appeal the Contracting Officer’s Final
        Decision
        C. Which Forum Do I Choose for My Appeal?
    
    V. Collecting on Your Judgment
        A. Agency Funds Available
        B. Agency Funds Unavailable
        C. Interest

    VI. Alternative Dispute Resolution, Another Avenue for Recovery?
        A. The Government’s Authority and Policy for Alternative Dispute
        Resolution
        B. Requirements to Use ADR

    VII. Some Words of Caution
        A. False Claims Act
        B. Contract Disputes Act
        C. Forfeiture, Suspension and Debarment

    VIII. Conclusion

BEST PRACTICES FOR CONSTRUCTION DEFECT LITIGATION
Kristan B. Burch
David H. Wise


    I. Whether to Take a Construction Defect Case from a Plaintiff’s
    Perspective
        A. Is the Potential Defendant Judgment-Proof?
        B. Is There Sufficient Insurance Coverage to Cover the Loss?
    
    II. Types of Construction Defects
    
    III. Prefiling Requirements and Settlement Demand

    IV. Common Claims for Plaintiffs in Construction Defect Cases
        A. Breach of Contract
        B. Breach of Express Warranty
        C. Breach of Implied Warranties for New Homes or New
        Condominiums
        D. Negligence
        E. Fraud - Actual or Constructive
        F. Virginia Consumer Protection Act
        G. Deceptive Trade Practices

    V. Initial Steps by Contractor in Response to Claim
        A. Acknowledge the Claim
        B. Provide Notice to Subcontractors/Suppliers and Relevant Insurers
        C. Inspect the Project
        D. Decide Whether to Hire a Consultant
        E. Decide Whether to Conduct Testing

    VI. Possible Legal Defenses for the Contractor to Raise in Response to
    Claims
        A. Statute of Repose
        B. Statute of Limitations
        C. Economic Loss Rule
        D. Lack of Timely Notice

LAW FIRM/IN-HOUSE COUNSEL RELATIONSHIPS: BENEFITS,
PITFALLS, EXPECTATIONS, AND SUCCESS KEYS

Frank J. Baltz
James M. Donahue
Neil S. Lowenstein


RESOLVING COMPLEX CONSTRUCTION DISPUTES
Hon. Leslie Alden
Shannon J. Briglia
Andrew B. Stephenson


    I. Introduction

    II. The Nature of the Project - Public or Private - Will Dictate the Options
    for Resolving the Dispute
        A. Federal Projects
        B. Virginia Projects

    III. Practical Alternatives for Resolving Disputes: A “Parade” of Resolution
    Techniques
        A. Informal Proceedings
        B. Formal - Arbitration
        C. Formal - Litigation

    IV. Identification and Use of Pressure Points Real and Perceived to Reach
    Resolution
    
    V. When is the Best Time to Resolve a Construction Dispute?
    
    VI. Conclusion

HOW TO PREPARE A CONSTRUCTION CLAIM

John J. Cullian
K. Brett Marston
Spencer M. Wiegard


    I. Introduction

    II. Identification of the Claim Issues
        A. Extra Work
        B. Unplanned Disruptions and Delays
        C. Acceleration
        D. Labor, Material or Equipment Problems or Shortages
        E. Design Problems
        F. Weather Delays
        G. Site Congestion

    III. Establishment of Entitlement
        A. Contractual Entitlement
        B. Factual Entitlement
        C. Analysis to Support Entitlement
    
    IV. Determination of Quantum
        A. Damages Allowed Under the Contract
        B. Types of Damages and Damage Claims
        C. Information Available for Damage Analysis
        D. Methods for Quantifying Damages

    V. Quantification of Damages
        A. Extended General Conditions
        B. Labor Escalation
        C. Labor Inefficiency/Lost Productivity
        D. Extended/Unabsorbed Home Office Overhead
        E. Other Damages

    VI. Presentation of the Claim
        A. Written Analysis of the Claim
        B. Visual and Oral Presentation

    VII. Conclusion

RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN CONSTRUCTION AND PUBLIC
CONTRACTS LAW IN VIRGINIA

John “Jack” Robb
Thomas M. Wolf


    I. Contracts
    
    II. Civil Procedure
    
    III. Indemnity and Insurance
    
    IV. Intellectual Property
    
    V. Criminal
    
    VI. Miscellaneous

Authors

Thomas E. Spahn

James R. Hart

Robert K. Richardson

Hanna Lee Blake

Christopher G. Hill

Charles Bolyard, Jr.

Michael Prezioso

Robert K. Cox

Henry D. Danforth

Leroy Trimbath

Kristan B. Burch

David H. Wise

Frank J. Baltz

James M. Donahue

Neil S. Lowenstein

Hon. Leslie Alden

Shannon J. Briglia

Andrew B. Stephenson

John J. Cullian

K. Brett Marston

Spencer M. Wiegard

John “Jack” Robb

Thomas M. Wolf

Prices

Print Only - $90
CLEAR THE DOCKET SALE - NOW JUST $10!
Purchase Options
  • Add to Cart

CONTACT US

Our Address

  • 105 Whitewood Road
    Charlottesville, VA 22901

JOIN OUR MAILING LIST:

  • Virginia CLE® is the non-profit educational division of the Virginia Law Foundation.

© 2016 Virginia Law Foundation